2012 REU Students' 3-Minute Presentations (Video)

SETI Institute 2012 REU Students:

Heather Chilton, California State University, Fullerton
Temporal Contrast Changes in Dark Slope Streaks on Mars
Mentor: Cynthia Phillips

Elyse Rankin-Gee, UCLA
Molecular and Biochemical Responses of Volvox Carteri to Oxidative Stress
Mentor: Oana Marcu

Rebecca Nakaba, Bennington College, VT
Mysterious Current: Refinement of Rock Stress Experiments previously conducted in August 2011
Mentors:  Friedemann Freund and Robert Dahlgren

Kathryn Steakley, University of Washington, Seattle
Meteor Showers of the February Sky
Mentor: Peter Jenniskens

Rachel Harris, Wellesley College
Hot Tub Time Machine: A glimpse into early earth habitability with acidophilic purple
non-sulfur bacteria
Mentors:  David Des Marais and Niki Parenteau

Allyn Durbin, Villanova University
Simulating snowfall: Water deposition on the martian northern ice cap
Mentor: Adrian Brown

Sarah Peacock, University of Virginia
Growing grains in the Perseus star forming region
Mentor: Jean Chiar

Abbey Nastan, Univeristy of Montana, Missoula
Linking present environmental change on Earth to rapid climate change on Mars at
the Noachian / Hesperian boundary: Implications for habitability
Mentor: Nathalie Cabrol

Ian Szumila, RPI
Differing Abundances of Gypsum in the primary and secondary dunes of the Martian
dune field Olympia Undae
Mentors:  Janice Bishop & Lori Fenton

Alex Baldwin, Cal Poly Pomona
Better, Cleaner, Faster: Code to tackle ATA data in real time
Mentor: Gerry Harp

Jason Alonzo, Cal Poly Pomona
Preliminary studies for the ORganices Exposure in Orbit (OREOcube)
experiment on the International Space Station
Mentor: Richard Quinn

Aaron Castellanos, Cal Poly Pomona
Can you hear me now? Improving the ATA from telescope observations through
data collection and analysis
Mentor: Gerry Harp


Details

Date
Wednesday, August 15 2012 - 12:00 pm, PDT
Description

The SETI Institute has been host to a class of 'Research Experience for Undergraduates' (REU) Students for the past eight weeks.
Students work with scientists at the SETI Institute and at the nearby NASA Ames Research Center on projects spanning the field of astrobiology from microbiology to planetary geology to observational astronomy.

The students presented 3-minute overviews of the work they have been doing this summer.

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