Monthly Digest July, 2014

SETI Institute, Wyse and NASA logosSETI Institute to Support Scientific Research at NASA Ames
The SETI Institute has been chosen as a key partner to support scientific and technical mission and project services at NASA Ames Research Center.

Jill TarterJill Tarter Awarded the 2014 Jansky Lectureship
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory has selected Jill Tarter to present the 49th annual Jansky Lecture (dates TBD).

Peter JenniskensPeter Jenniskens Reports Findings from May Meteor Shower Airborne Observations
The weak display of last month's Camelopardalids meteor shower, the result of the close passage of comet 209P/LINEAR, may have disappointed backyard observers, but this never-before-seen shower now has scientists excited.

David BlackQ&A with SETI Institute President and CEO, David Black
You asked, and SETI Institute President and CEO David Black answered. Check out some of the questions that SETI Institute fans posed this week.

nelly-ben-hayounNelly ben Hayoun Wins from Wired
Nelly directs the International Space Orchestra and works as designer of experiences for the SETI Institute—and now Nelly ben Hayoun has won a prestigious award from Wired magazine.

debbie-kolyerThe SETI Institute's Newest Rock Star
In recognition of her work to further research at the SETI Institute, the International Astronomical Union has chosen to name an asteroid after her: 8803 Kolyer.

wall with conference postersSPIE Montreal for the GPI team: work, social event and a landslide of papers
It was an important week for the Gemini Planet Imager Consortium while at the SPIE Astro in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

stephen kaneThe Diversity of Habitable Zones and the Planets
The field of exoplanets has rapidly expanded from the exclusivity of exoplanet detection to include exoplanet characterization.

lorenz rothWater Vapor at Europa's South Pole—Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope
With its subsurface water ocean and relatively young icy surface Europa is among the top candidates in the search for habitable environments in our solar system.

roxana lupuTerrestrial planet atmospheres in the aftermath of giant impacts
The final assembly of terrestrial planets is now universally thought to have occurred through a series of giant impacts, such as Earth's own Moon-forming impact.

lorenz rothWater Vapor at Europa's South Pole—Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope
With its subsurface water ocean and relatively young icy surface Europa is among the top candidates in the search for habitable environments in our solar system.

Big Picture Science Radio Show—Replace What Ails You
Germs can make us sick, but we didn't know about these puny pathogens prior to the end of the 19th century. Just the suggestion that a tiny bug could spread disease made eyes roll.

lorenz rothBig Picture Science Radio Show—A Stellar Job
The stars are out tonight. And they do more than just twinkle. These boiling balls of hot plasma can tell us something about other celestial phenomena.

roxana lupuBig Picture Science Radio Show—Skeptic Check: About Face
Face it—humans are pattern-seeking animals. We identify eyes, nose and mouth where there are none. Discover the roots of our face-tracking tendency—pareidolia—and why it sometimes leads us astray.

bps-4Big Picture Science Radio Show—Deep Time
Think back, way back, to what was happening on Earth 100,000 years ago. Or 100 million years ago. It's hard to fathom such enormous stretches of time, yet to understand the evolution of the cosmos—and our place in it—your mind needs to grasp the deep meaning of eons.

Jill Tarter next to the ATAFifty years of silence means we're just getting started
“I don't get out of bed every morning thinking, ‘Will I find extraterrestrial intelligence today?’ But I do think every day, ‘How can I improve the search?’ ”

Cassini portrait of Earth and MoonEarth and Moon Portrait
Cassini spacecraft captured this rare look at Earth and its moon from Saturn orbit on July 19, 2013.

I Zwicky 18I Zwicky 18
In 2004, the Hubble Space Telescope snapped this beautiful shot of a very young galaxy.

Cassini Grand Finale
NASA has chosen a fitting name for the dramatic final phase of its Saturn-studying Cassini mission, with a little help from the public.

Curiosity Finds Meteorite
Huge meteorite on mars discovered by Curiosity Rover. The meteorite known as "Lebanon" is nearly 7 feet (2 meters) wide and made of iron.